health-news

Gut bacteria linked to colorectal cancer

Washington, Dec. 7 : Researchers have discovered that colorectal cancer patients had fewer beneficial bacteria and more harmful bacteria than people without the disease.


Jiyoung Ahn, PhD, assistant professor of population health, and a member of NYU Cancer Institute, who led the study, said that the findings are important as identification of these microbes may open the door for colorectal cancer prevention and treatment.

The researchers compared the DNA composition of intestinal microbes in the stool samples of 141 colorectal cancer patients and healthy volunteers.

They found that samples from colorectal-cancer patients had larger populations of Fusobacteria than healthy volunteers. Fusobacteria commonly found in the mouth and gastrointestinal track, are associated with gut inflammation.

Moreover, case samples were more likely than the controls to be depleted of Clostridia, a class of beneficial gut bacteria that help digest dietary fiber and carbohydrates.

The study has been published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

--ANI (Posted on 07-12-2013)

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