technology-news

Mosquitoes can smell hosts better during night

Washington, Aug 31: Researchers from the University of Notre Dame's Eck Institute for Global Health, have found that the major malaria vector in Africa, the Anopheles gambiae mosquito, is able to smell major human host odorants better at night.


The study reports an integrative approach to examine the mosquito's ability to smell across the 24-hour day and involved proteomic, sensory physiological, and behavioral techniques.

The researchers, led by Associate Professor Giles Duffield and Assistant Professor Zain Syed of the Department of Biological Sciences, examined the role for a major chemosensory family of mosquito proteins, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), in the daily regulation of olfactory sensitivities in the malarial mosquito.

It is thought that OBPs in the insect antennae and mouth parts function to concentrate odorant molecules and assist in their transport to the actual olfactory receptors, thereby allowing for odorant detection.

The team revealed daily rhythmic protein abundance of OBPs, having higher concentrations in the mosquito's sensory organs at night than during the day.

This discovery could change the way we look at protecting ourselves from these disease-carrying pests.

This work provides the first comprehensive evidence of the important role of daily rhythms in the sensory biology of Anopheles gambiae and the implications for developing new control methods.

The study is published in the journal Nature.

--ANI (Posted on 31-08-2013)

technology-news headlines

NASA satellites show drought may take toll on Congo rainforest

Video games of the future to adapt to players' mood

World's oldest woman's blood hints at lifespan limits

How ravens maintain their social relations

Microbes help understand evolution of human language

Radiation exposure puts astronauts at risk of cognitive impairment: Study

Iceberg larger that island of Guam drifts away from Antarctic glacier

Manned mission to Mars necessary for our species to survive, says NASA chief

Gene therapy helps reverse loss of memory in mice suffering from Alzheimer's

New technology helps detect when drivers are about to nod off

Technology to catch dozing drivers on the go

This space selfie not to be missed!

Quick Links: Goa | Munnar | Pondicherry | Free Yearly Horoscope '2014

Comments

Your e-mail:


Your Full Name:


Type verification image:
verification image, type it in the box

Message:

Back to Top