health-news

Why we tend to lose our balance

Washington, Aug 15 : Have you ever wondered when you're strolling along and you suddenly stumble, the brain realizes you're falling but your muscles aren't doing anything to stop it.


For a young person, a fall is usually just embarrassing. However, for the elderly, falling can be life threatening.

Among the elderly who break a hip, 80 percent die within a year.

University of Michigan researchers believe that the critical window of time between when the brain senses a fall and the muscles respond may help explain why so many older people suffer these serious falls.

A better understanding of what happens in the brain and muscles during this lag could go a long way toward prevention.

To that end, researchers at the U-M School of Kinesiology developed a novel way of looking at the electrical response in the brain before and during a fall by using an electroencephalogram.

Findings showed that many areas of the brain sense and respond to a fall, but that happens well before the muscles react.

Lead researcher Daniel Ferris likened the study method to recording an orchestra with many microphones and then teasing out the sounds of specific instruments.

In the study, researchers measured electrical activity in different regions of the brain.

"We're using an EEG in a way others don't, to look at what's going on inside the brain," Ferris, a professor in kinesiology, said.

"We were able to determine what parts of the brain first identify when you are losing your balance during walking," he said.

--ANI (Posted on 15-08-2013)

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