health-news

Red meat, pork improve fertility: Expert

London, Jan 11 : Nutrients found in red meat play an important role in fertility levels and the general health of women and men planning a pregnancy, says an expert.


The intake of red meat and pork can make a difference, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

"Red meat is often associated with fertility in so-called 'old wives' tales' and has been traditionally encouraged in the diets of couples trying for a baby. Now we know from scientific research that the nutrients found in red meat really do have a role in normal fertility," said Carrie Ruxton from the Meat Advisory Panel.

The Meat Advisory Panel is a group of healthcare professionals who provide independent and objective information about red meat.

Most adults across the globe have chronically low intakes of selenium due to poor levels in soil.

Hence, numerous reports implicate selenium deficiency in several reproductive complications including male and female infertility, miscarriage, preeclampsia, foetal growth restriction, preterm labour, gestational diabetes and obstetric cholestasis.

Pork is an excellent source of selenium and can, therefore, go some way to boosting selenium levels in adults, thus supporting normal reproduction.

Vitamin B6 is one of the most important vitamins for conceiving and fertility because it contributes to the regulation of normal hormonal activity. Again, red meat is a rich source of Vitamin B6.

"The Government recommends that adults eat up to 500 gm of cooked red meat a week which gives the opportunity for four to five meat meals a week, including pork, ham, beef, lamb and bacon," added Ruxton.

--IANS (Posted on 11-01-2014)

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