• Sunday, 08 December 2019

Charlottesville violence: Trump defending far-right extremists leaves experts weeping

New York [U.S.], Aug. 16 : Donald Trump blaming both sides for the deadly violence in Charlottesville, saying he did not actually believe white supremacists were solely responsible for the Saturday incidents has left experts and media organisations gobsmacked, as America woke up to a cathartic news analysis of the President's press conference.

Charlottesville mayor, Michael Signer accused Trump for the violence saying that the latter had created an atmosphere of "coarseness, cynicism (and) bullying."

"He made a choice in his presidential campaign, the folks around him, to go to the gutter, to play on our worst prejudices," CBS quoted Signer, as saying.

Many Republicans joined in the criticism of Trump, including former presidential aspirants Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz.

Another Republican, Senator Lindsey Graham, told Fox News Sunday that She would urge the president to dissuade these groups that he's their sriend.

"I don't understand what's so hard about this. White supremacists and Neo-Nazis are evil and shouldn't be defended," Ohio Rep. Steve Stivers, chairman of the party's congressional election committee, said on Twitter.

"Just stopped on roadside to read @POTUS remarks. I nearly threw up. An American President offering a defense of white supremicists. My god," Democratic Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy said on Twitter.

Blaming "both sides" for #Charlottesville?! No. Back to relativism when dealing with KKK, Nazi sympathizers, white supremacists? Just no. Rep. IIeana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla. Said in a tweet.

"As a Jew, as an American, as a human, words cannot express my disgust and disappointment. This is not my President." Sen. Brian Schatz, a Democrat from Hawaii tweeted.

Senator Bernie Sanders, while commenting on the Donald Trump's latest remarks on Charlottesville clashes, has said that the United States President is embarrassing the country and the millions of Americans who fought and gave up their lives to defeat Nazism.

Sanders in a tweet said, "@realDonaldTrump, you are embarrassing our country and the millions of Americans who fought and died to defeat Nazism."

"The violence in Charlottesville was caused by Neo-Nazis and white supremacists attempting to spread their hateful and racist ideology," he added.

President Trump in a press conference, defended some of the white supremacy rally's participants, made the case for Confederate statues and equated neo-Nazis to leftist activist groups.

"This week, it is Robert E. Lee and this week, Stonewall Jackson. Is it George Washington next? You have to ask yourself, where does it stop?" Trump said.

The US President emphasised that both sides of the clashes contributed to the violence which happened in a white supremacists rally in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend.

Earlier, Trump had condemned the violence in Charlottesville, saying that "the hatred and division in the America must stop as we are all Americans first."

"We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides," he had said during a short statement, adding that he had been closely following terrible events unfolding in Virginia.

Mentioning that the current unfolding of events in Virginia is not linked to his presidency, Trump said, "It has been going on for a long time in our country -- notDonald Trump, not Barack Obama. It has been going on for a long, long time. It has no place in America."

"Hate and division in the country must stop. No matter our colour, creed, religion, our political party, we are all Americans first," he said, adding that he'd like for his administration to "study" why such violence is occurring. He didn't take questions from reporters.

"What is vital now is a swift restoration of law and order and the protection of innocent," noted Trump. "There are so many great things happening in our country, so when I watch Charlottesville, to me it is very, very sad."

Trump said that he spoke to Governor of Virginia, Terry McAuliffe and they agreed that the hate and the division in the America must stop and must stop right now.

"We have to come together as Americans with love for our nation and true affection-- really, I say this so strongly, true affection for each other."

He further said, "Our country is doing very well in so many ways. We have record -- just absolute record employment. We have unemployment the lowest it's been in almost 17 years. We have companies pouring into our country, Foxconn and car companies and so many others. They're coming back to our country. We're renegotiating trade deals to make them great for our country and great for the American worker."

Demonstrators clashed on the streets of Charlottesville ahead of a white nationalist rally, with counter-protesters and right-wing nationalist groups converging on the college town in the latest chapter in the United States' debate over race and identity.

The protests were initiated by the city's government decision of removing the confederate past, including a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Cities and states in the United States are considering taking down Confederate monuments following the clashes at Saturday's rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, which left one woman dead.



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