By Dr. Virender Sheorain, Gurgaon, Feb.6 Do you have a dragging like or aching pain within the scrotum -- the part of the body behind the penis. It causes a feeling of heaviness in the testicles, caused generally by the atrophy or shrinking of the testicles. The illness is called Varicocele. ANI | 6 months ago


The disorder is similar to what happens when one suffers from varicose veins, which occurs in our legs. This result in the backflow of blood. The backflow leads to permanent damage to the testicular tissue due to the disruption of normal supply of oxygenated blood through the testicular artery.

This disorder normally develops when a person is between 15 and 30 years of age. Fifteen to twenty percent of all males suffer from this disorder, and most of those suffering from this disorder are shy of disclosing it.

The disorder is caused by defective valves or compression of the veins. It can cause dilatation of the testicular veins near the testis, leading to the formation of a varicocele.

Those suffering from varicocele have a discrepancy in testicular size or marked semen abnormalities.

Till recently, surgery was the only option to cure this disorder. Recent advancement in medicine has made an alternative mode of treatment. It is called Varicocele Embolisation.

Varicocele Embolisation uses coils to block blood flow to the dilated vessels in a varicocele. It is performed by an Endovascular Specialist, who places a catheter in the affected vessel and then deploys the coil in the targeted area, to obtain the desired result.

The procedure is called Varicocele Embolization, which can be performed in an outpatient setting, and a person can return to his normal activities in 24 hours. Almost 95 percent of those who have undergone this procedure at Medanta Hospital in the National Capital Region of Delhi have met with success.

The success rate is measured by semen analysis and ability to procreate. Even a person with varicoceles on both sides can have the disorder cured through one vein puncture and the procedure does not require a general anesthesia.

The views expressed in the above article are that of Dr. Virender Sheorain, a specialist in endovascular surgery. He can be reached on his e-mail: Veeru_5@yahoo.com.

(Posted on 06-02-2014)