Washington, Dec 2

T

he US has squarely blamed Hamas for breaching the extended ceasefire even as Vice President Kamala Harris sought to discuss the situation in Gaza on how to end the war with influence of Arab leaders and heads of other nations at the climate summit in Dubai.

Israeli military forces reportedly resumed bombarding the Gaza Strip with airstrikes, after Hamas put an end to the weeklong pause in fighting, media reports said.

Israel alleged it resumed fighting after Hamas "violated" the ceasefire by firing rockets towards Israel.

Hamas officials blamed the Israelis, saying they turned down offers to release elderly hostages as well as claiming bodies of three hostages allegedly killed in Israeli air strikes.

The week-long truce saw over 100 hostages, all women and children including two Americans, were freed from Hamas captivity.

Seven Americans, including one woman, remain unaccounted for.

Over 240 Palestinians imprisoned in Israel were released in return.

The White House said on Friday that Hamas failed to deliver a list of hostages the militant group would release. Israel and Hamas presented conflicting narratives about why the truce ended.

"It's because of Hamas that this pause ended," said John Kirby, the National Security Council's coordinator for strategic communications.

"They were just simply unable, and failed to produce a list of hostages that could help enable the pause to extend," USA Today quoted Kirby as saying.

President Joe Biden along with the National Security Council remains engaged in hostage negotiations and efforts to end the war.

The US was pushing through with yet another major effort to bring about a pause and get more hostages released. Qatar, another international mediator along with Egypt, said it was working to renew a truce and expressed "deep regret" over the renewed combat.

Harris, now in Dubai for the climate summit, seeks to discuss war with Arab leaders and heads of other nations attending the two week long summit.

The World Health Organization (WHO) says it's 'extremely concerned' about continued fighting.

The WHO said Friday it is concerned about the health care system collapsing in Gaza since the resumption of Israelis aerial bombardment.

"The health system has been crippled by the ongoing hostilities. Gaza can't afford to lose any more hospitals or hospital beds," Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus posted to X.

US blames Hamas for breaching ceasefire; Kamala Harris seeks to discuss war with Arab leader at COP28

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