technology-news

Crocs cleverer than previously thought

Washington, Dec 05 : It seems that the crocodile can be a shrewd hunter himself, as a new study has revealed that some crocodiles use lures to hunt their prey.


Vladimir Dinets, a research assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is the first to observe two crocodilian species- muggers and American alligators- using twigs and sticks to lure birds, particularly during nest-building time.

Dinets first observed the behavior in 2007 when he spotted crocodiles lying in shallow water along the edge of a pond in India with small sticks or twigs positioned across their snouts. The behavior potentially fooled nest-building birds wading in the water for sticks into thinking the sticks were floating on the water. The crocodiles remained still for hours and if a bird neared the stick, they would lunge.

To see if the stick-displaying was a form of clever predation, Dinets and his colleagues performed systematic observations of the reptiles for one year at four sites in Louisiana, including two rookery and two nonrookery sites. A rookery is a bird breeding ground.

The researchers observed a significant increase in alligators displaying sticks on their snouts from March to May, the time birds were building nests. Specifically, the reptiles in rookeries had sticks on their snouts during and after the nest-building season. At non-rookery sites, the reptiles used lures during the nest-building season.

"This study changes the way crocodiles have historically been viewed," Dinets said. "They are typically seen as lethargic, stupid and boring but now they are known to exhibit flexible multimodal signaling, advanced parental care and highly coordinated group hunting tactics."

The observations could mean the behavior is more widespread within the reptilian group and could also shed light on how crocodiles' extinct relatives-dinosaurs-behaved.

The study was published in the journal Ethology, Ecology and Evolution.

--ANI (Posted on 05-12-2013)

technology-news headlines

Plants that regulate sprouting tackle climate change well

Feeling hot? Make the clouds rain

Earth's extinction rate highly exaggerated: Study

Fingernails glow when you make a call!

Talk to your smart phone to unlock car!

Novel X-ray method for better screening at airports

Why Neanderthals never had brain disorders

Soon, attack drones that can attack from ocean floor

Thinnest ever porous membrane 100,000 times thinner than human hair developed

NASA's LADEE crashes on moon as planned

Sun emits M7-class solar flare

LED bulbs can make your white shirt ineffective!

Quick Links: Goa | Munnar | Pondicherry | Free Yearly Horoscope '2014

Comments

Your e-mail:


Your Full Name:


Type verification image:
verification image, type it in the box

Message:

Back to Top