health-news

New stem cell breakthrough brings gastrointestinal disorders cure closer to reality

Washington, Dec 04 : Researches have successfully grown extensive numbers of intestinal stem cells and then coax them to develop into different types of mature intestinal cells.


For those living with gastrointestinal disorders, such as ulcers or Crohn's disease, treatment often means quelling uncomfortable symptoms through medications or dietary changes. But scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are hoping that their new study will lead to a new treatment for the disease.

"Being able to produce a large inventory of intestinal stem cells could be incredibly useful for stem cell therapy, where the cells could be delivered to patients to treat diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis," Jeffrey Karp, PhD, Division of Biomedical Engineering, BWH Department of Medicine, said.

"These cells could also be useful for pharmaceutical companies to screen and identify new drugs that could regulate diseases from inflammatory bowel disease, to diabetes, to obesity. However, to date there hasn't been a way to expand intestinal stem cell numbers," Karp said.

In the "crypts" of the human gut are immature adult stem cells that live alongside specialized cells called Paneth cells. The stem cells remain immature as long as they remain in contact with Paneth cells.

But the researchers found that when Paneth cells are removed and replaced with two small molecules involved in cell signalling, these molecules could direct the stem cells to develop into pure populations of proliferating stem cells. By introducing other molecules to the mix, the pure cells could further develop into specialized mature intestinal cells.

The study is published in journal Nature Methods.

--ANI (Posted on 05-12-2013)

health-news headlines

Colon cancer linked to dietary fats

Now, smart pill bottle that help you take your meds on time

Ginseng can help treat and prevent influenza and respiratory virus

Now, 3D-printed plaster cast to heal wound faster

How bariatric surgery can help control diabetes

McDonaldisation of gym culture spreading fast: Study

New drug to treat depression?

Now, the ICU comes home - at a fraction of the cost (Health Feature)

Malnutrition not priority for most parties: CRY

Testosterone levels in womb may impact your health

Bone marrow can cure blood disorders

Heart's development doesn't stop with birth

Quick Links: Goa | Munnar | Pondicherry | Free Yearly Horoscope '2014

Comments

Your e-mail:


Your Full Name:


Type verification image:
verification image, type it in the box

Message:

Back to Top