health-news

Acupuncture or counselling could help patients with depression

Washington, Sept 25 : A new study suggests that acupuncture or counselling, provided alongside usual care, could benefit patients with depression.


The study, conducted by a team led by Dr Hugh MacPherson, of the Department of Health Sciences at the University of York, found that in a primary care setting, combining acupuncture or counselling with usual care had some benefits after three months for patients with recurring depression.

The study, which also involved researchers from the Centre for Health Economics at York and Hull York Medical School, was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Programme Grants for Applied Research Programme.

Many patients with depression are interested in receiving non-drug therapies, however, there is limited evidence to support the use of acupuncture or counselling for depression in a primary care setting.

In this pragmatic randomised controlled trial conducted in the North of England, the research team randomised patients with depression to receive 12 weekly sessions of acupuncture plus usual care (302 patients), or 12 weekly sessions of counselling plus usual care (302 patients), or usual care alone (151 patients).

Compared with usual care alone, there was a significant reduction in average depression scores at three months for both the acupuncture and counselling interventions, but there was no significant difference in depression scores between the acupuncture and counselling groups.

At nine months and 12 months, because of improvements in the depression scores in the usual care group, acupuncture and counselling were no longer better than usual care.

The study is published in the journal PLOS Medicine.

--ANI (Posted on 26-09-2013)

health-news headlines

'Unproven treatment of spinal injuries can cause paralysis'

Can too much exercise be a bad thing?

New method to treat cocaine addiction effectively

Aspirin can lower colorectal cancer risks for people with specific gene

Aspirin may cut down colon cancer risks too

Prenatal smoking linked to enhanced aggressive behavior in children

Novel compound could halt cocaine addiction and relapse behaviors

Red meat could up heart disease risk

Vitamin D supplements have little effect on risk of falls among older people: Lancet

Marijuana use could up heart complications in young, middle-aged adults

Acupuncture improves activation of functional brain areas in stroke sufferers

Binge drinking could make you overeat

Quick Links: Goa | Munnar | Pondicherry | Free Yearly Horoscope '2014

Comments

Your e-mail:


Your Full Name:


Type verification image:
verification image, type it in the box

Message:

Back to Top