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Siberian mushroom 'Chaga' could help fight HIV virus

New York, Sept 19 : A group of Russian scientists claim that the Chaga fungus, which commonly grows on birch trees, could target the HIV virus.


According to the Wall Street Journal's Emerging Europe blog, mushrooms found in certain parts of Siberia could hold a promising answer to the deadly AIDS virus.

Scientists at Siberia's Vector research institute said that the Chaga mushroom could not only hold strong medicinal purposes, but fight against viruses like HIV, smallpox, and even influenza, the New York Daily News reported.

The institute, which was established during the Cold War, goes on to say the development is "promising."

The Changa fungi grows on birch trees in the northern stretches of Russia, and while scientists at Vector say that there are no solid tests linking the mushroom with combatting HIV, researchers said that the betulinic acid in the fungus is thought to be very toxic to cancers and other viruses.

--ANI (Posted on 19-09-2013)

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