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Why swatting a fly with bare hands is next to impossible!

London, Sept 16 : A new study has revealed that smaller animals tend to perceive time in slow-motion, which means that they can observe movement on a finer timescale than bigger creatures, allowing them to escape from larger predators.


It was found that smaller animals like insects and small birds, can see more information in one second than a larger animal such as an elephant, the BBC reported.

The study's lead author Kevin Healy, at Trinity College Dublin (TCD), Ireland, said that the ability to perceive time on very small scales may be the difference between life and death for fast-moving organisms such as predators and their prey.

Meanwhile, the reverse was found in bigger animals, which tend to view the world much slower and may miss things that smaller creatures can rapidly spot.

The current study focused on vertebrates, but the team also found that several fly species have eyes that react to stimulus more than four times quicker than the human eye.

The study suggested that in humans, too, there is variation among individuals.

For example, an experienced goalkeeper can process visual information more quickly, thereby observing where a ball comes from faster than others.

Andrew Jackson, a co-author of the study, said that the speed at which humans absorb visual information is also age-related. Younger people can react more quickly than older people, and this ability falls off further with increasing age.

The study is published in the journal Animal Behaviour.

--ANI (Posted on 16-09-2013)

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