technology-news

Why fish swim in schools

Washington, Sept 13 : A new study has tried to shed light on genetics of how and why fish swim in schools.


The research found two key components of schooling- the tendency to school and how well fish do it- map to different genomic regions in the threespine stickleback, a small fish native to the Northern Hemisphere.

How and why fish swim in schools has long fascinated biologists looking for clues to understand the complexities of social behaviour.

The study by a team of researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center may help provide some insight.

Lead author Anna Greenwood, Ph.D., said that if researchers can identify the genes that influence the fishes' interest in being social, they may be closer to understanding how genes drive human social behaviour.

Greenwood, a staff scientist in the Human Biology Division at Fred Hutch, said that the motivation to be social is common among fish and humans.
Some of the same brain regions and neurological chemicals that control human social behaviour are probably involved in fish social behaviour as well

Fish school primarily for protection from predators, and also to make swimming and foraging more efficient. Schools of fish in the wild are dynamic and fluid.

Beyond its findings connecting specific behaviours with genomic regions, the study also found that the same regions of the genome appear to control both the stickleback's ability to school as well as the anatomy of its lateral line, a system of organs that detect movement and vibration in water, and contain the same sensory hair cells found in the human ear.

That suggests a single gene could cause fish to detect their environment differently, Greenwood said, and supports the long-held notion that schooling behaviour is controlled in part by the lateral line.

The study is published in the journal of Current Biology.

--ANI (Posted on 14-09-2013)

technology-news headlines

NASA satellites show drought may take toll on Congo rainforest

Video games of the future to adapt to players' mood

World's oldest woman's blood hints at lifespan limits

How ravens maintain their social relations

Microbes help understand evolution of human language

Radiation exposure puts astronauts at risk of cognitive impairment: Study

Iceberg larger that island of Guam drifts away from Antarctic glacier

Manned mission to Mars necessary for our species to survive, says NASA chief

Gene therapy helps reverse loss of memory in mice suffering from Alzheimer's

New technology helps detect when drivers are about to nod off

Technology to catch dozing drivers on the go

This space selfie not to be missed!

Quick Links: Goa | Munnar | Pondicherry | Free Yearly Horoscope '2014

Comments

Your e-mail:


Your Full Name:


Type verification image:
verification image, type it in the box

Message:

Back to Top