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It's official: heart attacks occur more in winters

Washington, Sept 02 : A new study has found that the risk of getting a heart attack increases with decrease in temperature.


By means of a multivariate analysis, researchers revealed that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was strongly dependent on temperature.

It was found that AMI increased by 7 percent for each 10 degree Celsius decrease in minimal temperature.

Time series and univariate analysis of 15,964 AMI patients revealed a significant positive correlation between AMI and air pollution and an inverse correlation between AMI and temperature.

Professor Claeys said that additional analysis showed that the triggering effect of low temperature was also present outside the winter period. Apparently, smaller differences in temperature between indoor and outdoor can also precipitate AMI.

He added that a potential mechanism to explain the increased risk of coronary events associated with decreasing temperature is the stimulation of cold receptors in the skin and therefore the sympathetic nervous system, leading to a rise in catecholamine levels. Moreover, increased platelet aggregation and blood viscosity during cold exposure promotes thrombosis and clot formation.

--ANI (Posted on 02-09-2013)

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