health-news

Physicians' strong antibiotic prescriptions 'hazardous' for patients' health

Washington, Aug 5 : A new study has revealed that when US physicians prescribe antibiotics, more than 60 percent of the time they choose some of the strongest types of antibiotics, referred to as "broad spectrum," which are capable of killing multiple kinds of bacteria.


Unfortunately, in more than 25 percent of cases studied, such prescriptions are useless because the infection stems from a virus, which cannot be treated with antibiotics.

This overuse of antibiotics has a number of downsides, including that these types of drugs kill more of the "good" bacteria found in our bodies - which may lead to more side effects - and also contribute to the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, according to Adam L. Hersh, M.D., Ph.D., an infectious disease expert, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah School of Medicine and senior author on the study.

Discerning whether an infection is viral or bacterial can be tricky, according to Hersh, which probably accounts for much of the overuse of antibiotics.

"It seems that the natural bias, when there is uncertainty about an infection's cause, is to err on the side of prescribing antibiotics," he said.

"Our study found that the majority of prescriptions are for antibiotics that kill a wider range of bacteria, and that they are most likely to be given when they're not needed, such as in cases of viral infections," he added.

The types of illnesses where doctors seem to choose stronger antibiotics include respiratory problems, skin infections and urinary tract infections, which in many cases would be better treated by other antibiotics that are less likely to cause resistance.
The study is published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

--ANI (Posted on 05-08-2013)

health-news headlines

Colon cancer linked to dietary fats

Now, smart pill bottle that help you take your meds on time

Ginseng can help treat and prevent influenza and respiratory virus

Now, 3D-printed plaster cast to heal wound faster

How bariatric surgery can help control diabetes

McDonaldisation of gym culture spreading fast: Study

New drug to treat depression?

Now, the ICU comes home - at a fraction of the cost (Health Feature)

Malnutrition not priority for most parties: CRY

Testosterone levels in womb may impact your health

Bone marrow can cure blood disorders

Heart's development doesn't stop with birth

Quick Links: Goa | Munnar | Pondicherry | Free Yearly Horoscope '2014

Comments

Your e-mail:


Your Full Name:


Type verification image:
verification image, type it in the box

Message:

Back to Top