health-news

Why some patients experience memory loss while taking statins

Washington, May 11 : University of Arizona researchers have found a possible reason for the reversible memory loss that some patients experience while taking statins, a class of global top-selling cholesterol-lowering drugs.


They have made a novel discovery in brain cells being treated with statin drugs: unusual swellings within neurons, which the team has termed the "beads-on-a-string" effect.

The team is not entirely sure why the beads form, said UA neuroscientist Linda L. Restifo, who leads the investigation. However, the team believes that further investigation of the beads will help inform why some people experience cognitive declines while taking statins.

"What we think we've found is a laboratory demonstration of a problem in the neuron that is a more severe version for what is happening in some peoples' brains when they take statins," said Restifo, a UA professor of neuroscience, neurology and cellular and molecular medicine, and principal investigator on the project.

Robert Kraft, a former research associate in the department of neuroscience, is lead author on the article.

Restifo and Kraft cite clinical reports noting that statin users often are told by physicians that cognitive disturbances experienced while taking statins were likely due to aging or other effects. However, the UA team's research offers additional evidence that the cause for such declines in cognition is likely due to a negative response to statins.

The team also has found that removing statins results in a disappearance of the beads-on-a-string, and also a restoration of normal growth. With research continuing, the UA team intends to investigate how genetics may be involved in the bead formation and, thus, could cause hypersensitivity to the drugs in people. Team members believe that genetic differences could involve neurons directly, or the statin interaction with the blood-brain barrier.

"This is a great first step on the road toward more personalized medication and therapy. If we can figure out a way to identify patients who will have certain side effects, we can improve therapeutic outcomes," said David M. Labiner, who heads the UA department of neurology.

The findings were recently published in Disease Models and Mechanisms, a peer-reviewed journal.

--ANI (Posted on 11-05-2013)

health-news headlines

Lost stem cells are replaced by non-stem cells: Study

Brown fat breakthrough may be 'holy grail' of weight loss

Tuberculosis drug could also help treat other diseases

New method to fight Malaria drug resistance discovered

Dengue fever could soon be history

Four must eat white vegetables

Obesity can aggravate bone and muscle loss

'Severely infectious' bacterial strain can survive in contact lens solution

People undergoing weight loss surgery experience changes in appetite, taste and smell

Masculine boys and feminine girls likelier to engage in behaviors that poses cancer risk

Embrace daily massage to improve health

Internet use to ward off depression among elderly

Quick Links: Goa | Munnar | Pondicherry | Free Yearly Horoscope '2014

Comments

Your e-mail:


Your Full Name:


Type verification image:
verification image, type it in the box

Message:

Back to Top