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Fetal umbilical vein could help in middle cerebral artery's reconstruction

Washington, Jan. 1 : Researchers have substituted umbilical vein for artery in vascular transplantation, but they are still unclear if the stress relaxation and creep between these vessels are consistent.


A recent study reported in the Neural Regeneration Research showed that the stress decrease at 7 200 seconds was similar between the middle cerebral artery and fetal umbilical vein specimens, regardless of initial stress of 18.7 kPa or 22.5 kPa.

However, the strain increase at 7 200 seconds of fetal umbilical veins was larger than that of middle cerebral arteries.

Moreover, the stress relaxation experiment showed that the stress decrease at 7 200 seconds of the fetal umbilical vein and middle cerebral artery specimens under 22.5 kPa initial stress was less than the decrease in these specimens under 18.7 kPa initial stress.

These results indicate that the fetal umbilical vein has appropriate stress relaxation and creep properties for transplantation.

These properties are advantageous for vascular reconstruction, indicating that the fetal umbilical vein can be transplanted to repair middle cerebral artery injury.

--ANI (Posted on 01-01-2014)

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