health-news

New method for treating pancreatic cancer developed

Washington, Dec 21 : Researchers have developed a possible new method for treating pancreatic cancer which enables the body's immune system to attack and kill cancer cells.


The method uses a drug which breaks down the protective barrier surrounding pancreatic cancer tumours, enabling cancer-attacking T cells to get through. The drug is used in combination with an antibody that blocks a second target, which improves the activity of these T cells.

Initial tests of the combined treatment, carried out by researchers at the University of Cambridge's Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, resulted in almost complete elimination of cancer cells in one week.

The findings mark the first time this has been achieved in any pancreatic cancer model. In addition to pancreatic cancer, the approach could potentially be used in other types of solid tumour cancers.

Immunotherapy - stimulating the immune system to attack cancer cells - is a promising therapy for several types of solid tumours, but patients with pancreatic cancer have not responded to this approach, perhaps because the human form of the cancer, as in animal models, also creates a protective barrier around itself.

The research, led by Professor Douglas Fearon, determined that this barrier is created by a chemokine protein, CXCL12, which is produced by a specialised kind of connective tissue cell, called a carcinoma-associated fibroblast, or CAF.

The CXCL12 protein then coats the cancer cells where it acts as a biological shield that keeps T cells away. The effect of the shield was overcome by using a drug that specifically prevents the T cells from interacting with CXCL12.

"We observed that T cells were absent from the part of the tumour containing the cancer cells that were coated with chemokine, and the principal source of the chemokine was the CAFs," said Professor Fearon. "Interestingly, depleting the CAFs from the pancreatic cancer had a similar effect of allowing immune control of the tumour growth."

The drug used by the researchers was AMD3100, also known as Plerixafor, which blocks CXCR4, the receptor on the T cells for CXCL12, enabling T cells to reach and kill the cancer cells in pancreatic cancer models.

The study is published in the journal PNAS.

--ANI (Posted on 21-12-2013)

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