Making valuable items out of used tyres has become source of income in Nagaland

1 month ago | 17-02-2017 | ANI



Dimapur (Nagaland) , Feb. 17 : In the Burma camp area of Dimapur town in Nagaland, a section of people are making efforts to get the best out of tyres by reusing and recycling them and giving them various usable shapes.

Waste management and disposal has always been a major problem for people of all walks of life. Some of it gets recycled but a lot of it is simply dumped causing health hazards.

However, resourceful work by a section of people in the landlocked state of Nagaland is creating wonders as it is not only generating employment opportunities but also contributing to a healthier life and a greener environment.

In the Burma Camp area of Nagaland's Dimapur town, the Muslim community is making their efforts to get the best out of tyres by reusing and recycling them and giving them various usable shapes.

Making valuable items out of used tyres has become a source of income and a reason to have a better sustainable life for them.

They expressed that lots of risk and hard work are put on to get the best out of the used tyres.

"I have learnt this craftsmanship in Dimapur and have been working here for a long time. In the day, we prepare 10 buckets. Lots of hard work is put on by us and we need to be very careful as the use of knife is very much involved in this work. If we don't carefully use the knife while slicing the tyre, risk is involved. Three to four people are involved in it," said Mahmood Masood Ahmed, craftsman.

Essential products such as buckets, flower pots, cauldrons are manufactured and sold in the market and these products are used for various purposes and household chores.

The used tyres are meticulously sliced with a small sharp knife before giving it a perfect shape.

The price ranges from Rs. 100-200 for buckets whereas for cauldrons it starts from Rs 150- Rs 600 as per the sizes.

The workers are earning Rs 400- 500 per day, which is their only source of income.

"I have been working here for 20 years. In a month, I save up to Rs 200-300 after all my expenses. I am looking after my family of 3 members and my children are studying in school and college. So I am basically paying their fees with all the debt that I have to pay," said Salim, craftsman.

The hard work put on by these trivial manufacturers is not only helping them earn, but also in one way giving a boost to their creative work and contributing to the state's market economy.