London, Jan. 26 ANI | 6 months ago

Swedish divers have uncovered Stone Age artefacts left behind by Swedish nomads about 11,000 years ago, which has prompted some to claim that Sweden's Atlantis may have been found.


Project leader and archaeology professor at Sodertorn University Bjorn Nilsson told The Local that what they have found could be one of the oldest settlements from the first more permanent sites in Scania and in Sweden.

Nilsson's team was diving in Hano, a sandy bay off the coast of Skane County, and were given the resources by the Swedish National Heritage Board (Riksantikvarieambetet) needed for a 3-year excavation of an area 16 metres below the water's surface.
So far, the divers have uncovered a number of remnants believed to have been discarded in the water by nomadic Swedes in the Stone Age.

One of the biggest finds is an abandoned harpoon carving from animal bone, discarded into the water along with wood pieces, flint tools, animal horns, and bones of the aurochs, the ancestor of domestic cattle, the last of which died off in the early 1600s.

(Posted on 26-01-2014)