Sydney, Mar. 11 ANI | 4 months ago

There yet remains any confirmation about the missing Malaysian jet's whereabouts, however, experts have revealed that its not hard for jets to just 'disappear' over the ocean.


Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 is reportedly not the only incidence in which the airline abruptly lost contact with ground, only to be discovered in debris condition even years later.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, it took two years to find the main wreckage of an Air France jet that plunged into the Atlantic Ocean in 2009, and it took a week to locate the debris from an Indonesian jet in 2007.

Professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Queensland in Australia, Michael Smart, observed that if crashes come down in the middle of the ocean and its not near a shipping lane or something, it is unfathomable how long it could take to find them.

The missing flight, with 239 people on board, including two mysterious travelers who boarded with stolen passports, is also suspected to have made a U-turn, adding one more level of uncertainty to the effort to find it.

Captain John M. Cox, CEO of Safety Operating Systems, said that it wasn't the first time they had to wait for a few days to find the wreckage.

Cox believes that it was increasingly clear that the plane somehow veered from its normal flight path and after the plane disappeared from radar, it must have been 'intact and flew for some period of time and beyond that, it's all speculation.'

Professor Smart opined that whether the plane broke up in midair or crashed into the water, there would be some debris and it would be unlikely that it would just be destroyed and turned to dust.

Meanwhile, Malaysian civil aviation chief Azharuddin Abdul Rahman said that more than 1000 people and at least 34 planes and 40 ships were searching a radius of 185 kilometres around the last known location of Flight MH370, the report added.

(Posted on 11-03-2014)